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20130801
20130831
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tomorrow night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> secretary of state john kerry named sean casey hit his dear advisor on faith-based initiatives. dedicated on outreach to the global community. this is an outreach event for 30 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> ladies and gentlemen, the secretary of state, john kerry, special advisor for faith-based initiatives and director of the white house office of security. >> thank you so much, everyone. thank you so much. i am really delighted to be here with you this morning. it is a great pleasure for me to take part in us. i'm convinced that this is one of the toughest challenges that we face in terms of global diplomacy and relationships around the world. we have had the challenges of many conflicts to the challenges of simply understanding people. we are talking about regions apart and things like global climate change, which is really a challenge. this includes the garden figures of gods creation. secretary of state and before that. i was a secretary before that. i had met with faith-based leaders all across the world. we met with many mem
briefcase of the the only thing inside was a brand new copy of sean hannit's new book "deliver us from evil." you have to picture the scene we walked up to the security checkpoint and i'm now the individual who not only takes off his shoes and walks through the magnitometer but i am i have the thorough examination. what pops out is hannit's mug on the new book. i didn't complain about the process. i believe we all have an obligation in the war on terror to do our small part. i thought it was a bit ridiculous. but i blamed osama bin laden. i cursed him under my breath. i got on the plane and we headed to florida. one week later it was time to now do this in reverse. you know that i host a daily morning program here in philadelphia. what you may not know is that each of our homes are also wired for sound. and so when in florida for spring break it's a vacation for the family, but i'm loathe to be off the air. i have a studio in our place in florida and i remain on the air. there is a piece of electronic equipment that allows me to be on the air, a comrex matrix. if you didn't know what it was
attacked by the right. i got attacked by fox sean hannity rush limbaugh and i'm saying the names out loud, all of them came at me this week. these people called me and p is c and everything they could call me except a child of god. why did they do that? because i had the nerve to critique this american gods, small g not be too mad. they said o'connor you are coming after god that i was coming up to their god. i was not coming after the god of the scriptures, the god that we know abraham isaac and jacob. i was talking about the god they worship, racism, the god they worship white supremacy so i know this is going to go out everywhere else but how many times can they e-mail my people and everything else. thank god i've got a great institution that takes care of me. i have tenure. i can get fired. a positive and for the people who called the schomberg this week to try to get me off this panel i hope you enjoyed the show. [applause] but wait, one more thing i want to say. this prophetic voice of progressive christianity is missing. we don't hear these voices anymore. it is violent because the
got attacked by the right. i got attacked by fox, sean hannity, rush limbaugh, i'm saying all y'all's names out loud, daily caller, all of them. these people called me a b, the c, everything else they could call me except a child of god, okay? and why did they do that? because i had the nerve to critique this american god. small g now, not big g. but they were like, oh, no, you're coming after after god. but, see, i was coming after their god. i was not coming after the god of scriptures, the god that we know of abraham, isaac and jacob. i was coming after the god they worship, racism, the god they worship, white supremacy. so i know this is going to go out everywhere else and, you know, how many times can they e-mail my people, you know, thank god i got a great institution that takes care of me. i have ten your. i can't get fired. [applause] and for the people who call this week to try to get me off panel, i hope you enjoy the show. [laughter] [applause] but wait, one more thing i want to say. you see, this prophetic voice of progressive christianity is missing. we don't hear t
the audience. >> hi. my name is sean lingus, i'm a reporter with smart grid today. my question is for mr. , mr. izard and anyone else who wants to answer. it's been said with regards to isac there aren't enough security clearances in the industry for everyone who wants to participate. does nerc acknowledge that this is a problem and, if so, what's being done to address it? >> hi, sean. thanks for the question. we, industry recognized that we needed to get security clearances out to those that really need it, so then you do the simple math, i want to say there's 4,000 entities, and you come up with a model that maybe three or four clearances are needed for entity. you do the math, it's just simply not achievable with the budget with constraints, the handling of that many background investigations, etc., etc. so who really should get those clearances? well, the cip committee, the technical committee that reports directly to the board of directors tackled this problem for about the eight months. we formed a task force, and we built a product. that's one of the reports that's going to the board he
. and lastly, we're joined by mr. sean moulton, the director of open policy program, for a group which aim dozen promote government accountability and openness. mr. moulton served for several years as a research fellow and contract employee at the united states environmental protection agency. i want to thank all of you for being here. your full mint statement -- written statements will appear in the record and i ask you to do your best to contain your testimony to the five minutes. and we look forward to engaging you in questions. the chair now recognizes mr. dippel for five minutes. >> my names donnie dippel, president of texas ag industries association. subcommittee chairman mahan, ranking subcommittee member clark, and thank you for letting us testify at this meeting. before i given my time i'd like to extent my thoughts and prayers to the fellow texasns who experienced should great loss as a result of the west, texas, explosion. texas ag industries association membership is comprised of manufacturers, distributors, retailer dealers and allied companies involved in the sale of federal
on the seventh floor overs been uttered a few times in the last 12 year, and sean joyce is here, i'm sure has heard it once or twice in the last few years, deputy handle. all good leaders need how to delegate, and that's something that happened from time to time. and i thank you for those lessons, bob, because in my three years at tsa, i've learned some of the benefits of doing that. [laughter] so a couple brief points to wrawp. as, bob, as you and ann leave government service and as you start traveling without your security detail, there's a couple words you need to know that will be very important to you, and that is tsa precheck. laugh after -- [laughter] trust me on this one. [laughter] >> now you know why you were invited. >> that's right, that's right. [laughter] [applause] and so finally, on behalf of all the men and women of the fbi who have had the privilege and honor of serving with mr. director bob mueller these last 12 years, let me express profound appreciation and gratitude for what you have done, guiding the bureau through a tumultuous time with integrity and distinction, and o
as evidenced by your recently introduced chris stevens, sean smith, bill b and ecurity and personal security of 2013. it has been a concern since inception of embassy security almost 100 years ago. to counter these global threats come in, the office of the chief special agent was formed in 1916. it was not, however until 1985 at the same time is preparing for service to the u.s. government and the mission and vision was part of the team that i particularly wanted to join. in 1987, i became a special agent and since then i have devoted my 26 year career to fulfilling the mission to provide a safe and secure environment for the conduct of foreign policy. i have manage security programs is a regional security officer in iraq and pakistan and jerusalem and philippines and indonesia. to demonstrate the depth of my experience and not of special agent come i would like to highlight a few of my accomplishments. i have dealt daily with possible terrorist acts that have impacted the lives of americans to include the kidnapping of americans in the philippines as well as participating in the capture of
administrator. sean o'keefe has been acting administrator of the navy. if you have a person is qualified, historians will tell you. i love my work and i think my people enjoy working for me. my job is to facilitate their success we want to be the best place work in government. c-span: you mentioned having dinner in iraq and afghanistan. he is now an oscar nod. where is he at now? >> guest: is a navy s.e.a.l. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: he wanted to be an astronaut. they come from all walks of life. i apply for the state program and i was picked up and i went all the way through a 14 year career where nasa reimburse me for my salary. in the marine corps let me go for 14 years and i went back. c-span: so what does the space station do? >> guest: most of it is science, scientific investigation. solar science, we now have a number of earth science experiments that are there looking up the atmosphere. we are doing technology development that is the product of many nations, more than 20 nations that have the science experiment. it is a basic physics experiment looking at the beginni
originated with sean schoch who still who was a -- of the enlightenment that childhood education which drew on these theories was started with john dewey who was fantastically influential not just our education in america but it came over to britain as well and what childhood education was and what his whole philosophy was that when a child brings to the classroom experience is impanelinimpanelin g more important than anything that the adult world can give to the child. the child is like it -- you have to water it gently and then the plant grows. anything the adult world gives to the child is a constriction of that growth so when the child comes to the classroom the child brings the ability to learn by himself and the adult world with the teacher has to do is take a backseat and gently water it but not actually feed it. not actually give that child information or knowledge because that constrains the child and will cripple him forever. that philosophy what became child centered education which is not only ruined i think american education but certainly from my perspective what i know most a
. an elderly gentleman pulled in front of sean and he hit the car. about nine days later he died. he had a public defender in spokane, washington who really went to bat. so she was carrying about 101 cases compared to the prosecutor was working opposite her who had 36 cases. so she was really pushed to take this case to trial before she was ready. she had done several trials in the last two months and said that i need a little bit more time. the judge says that should go ahead. you know, this was like a friday. she had to go to court on monday. she decided to refuse and take a stand and say that that would be an assistance of counsel. i'm not prepared for a trial. due to the crunch of money in their office and limited ability to call in this, she was like, i need more time. the judge threatened to hold her in contempt of court. ultimately she was given a few more weeks to prepare for the trial. the elderly man at have been hospitalized and operated on for a hernia, which is a pre-existing condition. his own doctor had known about this for a long time and declined to operate because he wa
we'd all like to see right now. >> thanks for that. from the audience. >> hi, my name is sean lingus, i'm a reporter. my question is for mr. blizard and anyone else who wants to answer. it's been sate with regard to isac there aren't enough clearances in the industry for everyone who wants to participate. does nerc acknowledge this is a problem and, if so, what's being done to address it? >> sean, thanks for the question. we, industry recognized that we needed to get security clearances out to those that really need it, so then you do the simple math. i want to say there's 4,000 entityies, and you come up with a model that maybe three or four clearances are needed per entity. you do the math, it's just simply not achievable with the budget constraints, the handling of that many background investigations, etc., etc. so who really should get those clearances? well, the cip committee, the technical committee that reports directly to the board of directors, tackled this problem about the last eight months. we formed a task force, and we built a product. that's one of the reports that's g
you. this lady here next to sean. >> a little bit more about how marketplace pressures affect the work that your organization does? years ago there was the camel news hour. today there is more instances of advertising perhaps masquerading as journalism. >> are you trying to get us in trouble? [laughter] >> you asked about the sponsor content in that kind of thing? >> just perhaps what challenges your organization has faced in either keeping that it may or trying to do something with it? >> for us we are a little bit different than a lot of organizations because we don't have advertisement. we don't have down there at some we don't have pop-up ads and things like that. the advertising that is done on our site is responsive content and is labeled as such. it says this post is sponsored by or written by the acme widget corp. and it is very much in line with how we do things in terms of how the advertising is generally written in presented mostly because we do viral marketing. if the advertisements are done the same way the way we get our stories out is to write them in a way that people w
headquarters that has been uttered a few times, and sean joyce is here and has heard it once or twice, the deputy of the leaders need to know how to delegate and that is something that happens from time to time. thank you for those lessons because i've learned the benefits of doing that. so a couple of brief points to wrap up. as you and anne start traveling without your 60 detail there's a couple of words you need to know there will be important to you, and that is the tsa recheck. [laughter] trust me on this one. >> now you know why you were invited. >> that's right. there you go. and so finally, on behalf of all of the men and women at the fbi who's had the privilege, and the honor of serving with mr. director bob mueller these last 12 years, let me express a found appreciation and gratitude for what you have done guiding the bureau through a tumultuous time with integrity and distinction, and on a personal note to say thanks for the privilege of serving as one of your deputy director's for encouraging me at teaching me lessons in leadership which i have had the opportunity to use.
sean, a reporter with sharp grid today. it's been said that with regards to isac there are not enough security clearances for everyone who wants to participate. it's acknowledged this is a problem and what is being done to address it. >> thanks for the question. the industry recognized we needed to get security clearances out to those that really need it. so then you do the simple math, and i want to say there's 4,000 entities and to come up with a model that may be three or four clearances are needed for entities. do the math, it's just simply not achievable with the budget constraints, the handling of that many background investigations, et cetera, et cetera. so, who really should get those clearances? well, the technical committee that reports directly to the board of directors, tackled this problem for the last eight months. they formed a task force and we built a product. that's one of the reports going to the board here next week, and if it's approved, accepted, by the board, it will become public. that is one model for the clearance issue. and i look forward to getting that in
, thank you. >> sean phillips with the m a. have a question about transparency, we are seeing more articles in the new york times recently how expensive a sailing trip can be, where one provider will charge $500 and another one charges only $100. these are things that will be difficult for consumers to see, that line item might not be easily broken out, might not see it at all. as you mention it, consumers read through their packages, the package provided by the employer to the employee, not the provider. as you said it gets very complex and some of these fees will not be there. it will be hard for the employee to control their costs. how are the employers going to help the employees with that? >> the good news is most of the health plans now including united and cigna, anthem, a number of health plans on the leading edge have apps, applications that allow people to know a couple things and some third parties like compare health and others. this is a fast-moving field. whether an employee or consumer or patient needs to know, what is it going to cost them? even the data on charges,
, thank you. >> sean forbes. i had a question about transparency and we are seeing more articles say in "the new york times" recently about how expensive a saline drip can be where one provider will charge 500 plus dollars and another charges only 100 plus. these are things that will be very difficult or consumers. the line item may not be broken out or they might not see it at all and as you mentioned consumers need to read through their packages but that's the package provided by the employee and not the provider. as you said this gets very complex and it's going to be very hard for an employee to control their costs. how are the employers going to help the employees without? >> yeah so most of the health plans now including united at the cigna anthem and number of health plans are are on the leading edge have applications that allow people to know a couple of things and also some third parties. this is a fast-moving field and what a consumer patient need to know are what's it going to cost them so even that data on charges we know nobody pays most of those so it's a question of wh
is sean and i'm a reporter with federal times a publication that covers the federal agencies so we do a lot of agencies. tony i completely agree with you with what you said about -- i would also have their agencies that will not deal with reporters on any basis except e-mail. as an employee you probably know -- >> it drives me crazy. >> a treasury employer doesn't check her messages. send her an e-mail. to get to my question though one frustration i found in covering the government is a lot of pao's and i'm asking the context of principles essentially that the dao should follow that they are political appointees and the only qualification for the job and this was true for for the obamas ration is the work on the campaign. should that be allowed? >> look, i think you want to try to find talent where you can and try to match it up. there is the public affairs office. they actually do work for the people who are elected and they are answerable to them in the cases where they are political appointees. i was a political appointee. so i think i don't think you can change the whole sub inner
. thank you. gosh. here and then behind you. the lady here. next to sean. >> talk a little bit more about how marketplace pressures effect the work your organization does. years ago there was a campbell "newshour." today there's more instances of advertising perhaps mast raiding as journalism. >> trying to get us in trouble. [laughter] you ask about sponsor content and that kind of thing? >> just perhaps what challenges your organization has faced in keeping that at bay or trying to do something with it. >> well, for us we're a little bit different in a lot of organizations. we don't have advertisement. we don't have banner ads or popup ads things like that. the fizzment on our site is a sort of sponsored content. it's labeled as such as post sponsored by or written by corporation. and -- learning how to do things in term of how the advertisement are generally written and presented. mostly because we do viral marketing, you know, advertisements are done for the same way. weth way we get our story out in a way that quickly share them with each other. the advertisement done our site is simi
tell you my personalities are. rush limbaugh, sean hannity, mark levine. i always tell our clients can i say, i don't agree with what they say but i agreed with the value of the customer that they put in front of you. but if you listen to what they say, if you listen to the words, it's all buzz. and see what happens is, the people that are fans of that type of talk radio, they are listening very carefully. we are not paying attention. and what they're doing in effect is mobilizing their forces. so what we have to do is we have to make sure that we educate our young people. we have to make sure that they are politically astute. we need to make sure that they are a part of the process of making change in our community. and that's what i believe the role of a segment and a zeta and the mine nine organization did. we both of youth auxiliary groups. zeta hous has agreed. we need to make sure that we have a political action arm that is teaching our young people about what their history is but more important how they can change the future. and if we can do that effectively, we then help to se
] >> thank you very much. my name is sean gray from the university. i was in russia for seven years. i would like to ask the panel a question about russia's future. i have seen my peers and the generation younger than me growing up in russia and i noticed that basically if they are smart and if they are liberals who are thinking they will try to leave the country and you mentioned silicon valley about how russia is one of the languages and they are very smart but unfortunately they are not looking to improve their country and the legal systems and so forth. then you see the other guys that are staying there and a lot of these nationalists and people like that who are going and protesting in the beating and stuff like that. others protests and then they are rising of taking positions in the government as well. that's the future in russia itself. he's not going to be around for very long and this is a question that always [inaudible] [laughter] >> sorry about that. [laughter] >> speaking as a member of the younger generation looking for work in the future i didn't mean to offend anybody. unfor
them are crucial to get information to the public in a timely manner. sean donnelly is committee chairman who moderates this discussion. >> welcome to the national press club. for this evening's discussion of whether or not a federal public affairs officers have become a hindrance more and help, press freedom and open government or if you like, our shorter title, tax for slacks. line name is john donnelly, reporter with congressional quarterly and roll call and chairman of the national press club press freedom committee which is sponsoring tonight's event with the young members committee. you can find out more about the national press club and membership therein at press.org. we are the leading organization in the world for journalists. tonight's event is being broadcast on that site. it will be archived later. is also being broadcast on c-span2 right now. if you are following us on twitter the handle this@press theclubtv and the hash club is open government. .. >> i would like to make a few comments just to set the stage for tonight event. our discussion tonight is about the gro
and sean nicknamed that treat. and, indeed, it was. so when i began writing "we are water" i took those two actual unrelated hometown events, alice's untied death and the norwich flood, and i set them apart from each other like polls, electrodes i guess, and in the space between them, a kind of electrical energy began to bounce and crackle and generate itself, and electrical art if you will over the next four years became the arc of my story. and so as facts became fishing, ellis became the younger and more there'll josephus jones who dies at the hands of the bigoted white father who suspects that ellis has had a clandestine sexual relationship with his daughter. and the margaret moody became flood victim moral, his baby daughter perishes with her in the flood, and his five year old daughter grows up and becomes an unschooled outsider artist, and one of the novels two main characters. so before i close let me do one last bit of time traveling. this time into the not-too-distant future. at the end of october of this year, "we are water" will become available in libraries and brick-and-mortar
-year-old first. what happened to him? >> host: this is a story about a young man named sean. who was arrested when he was 18 years old. he had just turned 18. just got his first used car. and he was driving it. he hadn't -- actually on the way to cash his paycheck to go pay for car insurance. he was in a car accident. and he was not at fault he had the right away and an elderly man and his family pulled in john and he hit the car. the elderly gentleman was taking to the hospital, and about nine days later he died. and sean was charged with vehicular manslaughter, and he had a public defenders in washington. a woman named carol who went to bat despite her crushing case load. she was carrying about 101 cases compared to the prosecutors who was working opposite her who had 36 cases. so she was pushed to take this case to trial before she was ready. she had done several trials in the last two months, she said to the judge i need a little more time. the judge said no, you have to go ahead. and, you know, it was a friday. she decided to go to court on monday. she decided to refuse and
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